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Buying a Dental Practice Tips

Buying a Dental Practice Tips

Tip 1: Verify you have an accurate active patient count. Often the count is greatly inflated. This is less of an issue then in the past due to practice management software.

If patient info has been correctly entered for all patients then the active patient count should be good. Practice purchase tip 1: Verify you have an accurate active patient count. Often the count is greatly inflated. This is less of an issue then in the past due to practice management software. If patient info has been correctly entered for all patients then the active patient count should be good. 

Tip 2: There are different opinions as to what constitutes an active patient but counting any recall patients going back eighteen months works. Doing so takes into account patients who have slipped off the radar but can be gotten back in. 

Tip 3: Has extensive dentistry already been done on most patients? If so, then most of the new production from active patients will be in hygiene. The more complete dentistry that has been done, the less ROI. If there hasn't been a lot of comprehensive dentistry done you can  convert many of the patients, if you do so on a gradient. 

Tip 4: Will the selling dentist stay on for an appropriate amount of time to introduce you to the patients, etc? How long depends depends on how adequate the patient base is. The purchasing dentist usually has a heavy debt load so needs to make as much income as possible. I've not seen a dentist staying on for a long period of time to be workable unless there is plenty of work for both dentists and the chemistry between them is right.


Tip 5: The staff in a practice that is old school will often be set in their ways and are often computer illiterate, to one degree or another. Staff who have been with the dentist for a long time are usually practicing a style of dentistry that is outmoded. The time and frustration to train them is generally not worth it. However, if possible, you don't want wholesale changes in the hygiene and front desk positions, for approximately six months, as these are usually the positions the patients bond with the most.

Scheduling Tips
Staff: To discipline or not?

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