Blog | Cambridge Dental Consultants

Dental Practice Management and Dental Consulting Articles.

When is a Breach Not a Breach?

When is a Breach Not a Breach?

Have you suffered a data breach?

A four-step assessment:

A data breach in the dental industry isn’t just nerve-racking – it’s also expensive and can potentially shut a practice down. The bad news is nearly every company will experience a data breach of some magnitude during the life of their company. This guide helps you to identify the type and severity of a data breach.

Across all business sectors in 2014, there were approximately 783 data breaches that resulted in 85 million records being compromised. In the healthcare industry alone, there were 333 breaches and 8.2 million records compromised.

There’s a lot of confusion on what constitutes a breach in the healthcare industry. Under HIPAA, it is presumed that an impermissible use or disclosure of protected health information (PHI) is a breach unless the covered entity or business associate demonstrates that there is a low probability that the PHI was compromised.

To make that determination, HIPAA mandates that those organizations perform a risk assessment on at least the following four factors:

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"Risky" Business

As we have discussed in many previous articles, HIPAA has changed the way that dental practices need to operate. Not only do dentists need to be current on the latest technology and IT systems, but they must also ensure that they incorporate technologies in a HIPAA compliant manner.

While we’ve looked at things from a technical standpoint, most offices that have gone through the process of HIPAA compliance realize there are many administrative parts of HIPAA as well. In fact, more than 50% of all HIPAA rules and regulations are administrative in nature.

While we will examine many of these in the coming months, there is one critical component that should be talked about first, as most HIPAA auditors will ask for this the minute they walk through the door, and that is a copy of your most recent risk analysis.

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Are You Stretching?

Are You Stretching?

 

Practicing as a dental hygienist demands physical stamina and we know that regularly stretching our muscles can help avoid the physiological aches and pains that come with the job. We as dental hygienists must also have the ability to regularly stretch our comfort zones. That’s the kind of stretching that will eventually help to alleviate the psychological strains we inevitably encounter in our careers. Moving beyond our comfort zones enables us to see what our capabilities are, to better establish successful partnerships with doctors, propel the future of dental hygiene forward while securing our own place within the field, and ultimately makes us better at what we do.

Like most hygienists I am concerned about job market saturation. I would find myself feeling twinges of resentment when I heard candidates planning to attend hygiene school or just entering the market. They were excited about their goals and reaching graduation – maybe I was a little jealous of the years and new opportunities available to them. Then I realized my years of experience may have something to offer these newer hygienists that could help them to create more fulfilling and prosperous careers. Adapting outside the limiting parameters of my own comfort zone gave me a new perspective on my past, present, and future role in dental hygiene and helped to renew my sense of purpose in the profession I have loved.

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How Not to Hire the Wrong People

How Not to Hire the Wrong People

Much has been written about hiring the right people for dentists. Finding a good personality fit and ensuring that employees properly project your office’s personality are things others know far more than I do, so there is little that I can contribute to that discussion.

However, my background as a private investigator and the CEO of the world’s largest dental embezzlement investigation firm provides some insight into how “serial embezzlers”, who are the very LAST people you want to hire, successfully conceal unsavory pasts. I’d like to share what I have learned about their tactics.

Let’s start by profiling typical embezzlers. They are smart, organized, and have strong computer skills. They present well in interviews, and convey an understanding of the preciousness of your time, and commit to creating an environment where that time can be used most effectively. They present an attractive resume without typos (seemingly a rarity today). And, of course, they have dental experience, although you don’t yet fully comprehend the nature of that experience.

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